Updating multiple columns using forall international popular dating site

Using “select * from tab2 minus select * from tab2” compares every column of every row against the other table for comparison (something that came in very handy for testing replication back in 8i).

Now that we know our source tables are ready for the MERGE, let’s get to it: declare 2 type t_customers is table of customers%rowtype; 3 lv_customers_tab t_customers; 4 begin 5 select * bulk collect into lv_customers_tab from customers; 6 forall rec in lv_customers_tab.first ..

Methods such as FIRST, LAST, PRIOR, and NEXT are good for traversing the collection while methods such as EXPAND and DELETE are good for manipulation.

As you iterate through a collection you can use and modify data with the COLLECTIONNAME(index). And once you’re done working with the collection you can write it as a contiguous chunk of data or as a sparse collection to your target table.

Bulk binds and bulk loading are nothing new; in fact, the feature came out in Oracle 8i.

The real power of bulk binds is in how you can manipulate the objects.I have logged in as SH and created a copy of the CUSTOMERS table by using the query: select dbms_metadata.get_ddl(‘TABLE’, ‘CUSTOMERS’) from dual; desc customers Name Null?Type ----------------------------------------- -------- ---------------------------- CUST_ID NOT NULL NUMBER CUST_FIRST_NAME NOT NULL VARCHAR2(20) CUST_LAST_NAME NOT NULL VARCHAR2(40) CUST_GENDER NOT NULL CHAR(1) CUST_YEAR_OF_BIRTH NOT NULL NUMBER(4) CUST_MARITAL_STATUS VARCHAR2(20) CUST_STREET_ADDRESS NOT NULL VARCHAR2(40) CUST_POSTAL_CODE NOT NULL VARCHAR2(10) CUST_CITY NOT NULL VARCHAR2(30) CUST_CITY_ID NOT NULL NUMBER CUST_STATE_PROVINCE NOT NULL VARCHAR2(40) CUST_STATE_PROVINCE_ID NOT NULL NUMBER COUNTRY_ID NOT NULL NUMBER CUST_MAIN_PHONE_NUMBER NOT NULL VARCHAR2(25) CUST_INCOME_LEVEL VARCHAR2(30) CUST_CREDIT_LIMIT NUMBER CUST_EMAIL VARCHAR2(30) CUST_TOTAL NOT NULL VARCHAR2(14) CUST_TOTAL_ID NOT NULL NUMBER CUST_SRC_ID NUMBER CUST_EFF_FROM DATE CUST_EFF_TO DATE CUST_VALID VARCHAR2(1) SQL desc customers2 Name Null?Type ----------------------------------------- -------- ---------------------------- CUST_ID NOT NULL NUMBER CUST_FIRST_NAME NOT NULL VARCHAR2(20) CUST_LAST_NAME NOT NULL VARCHAR2(40) CUST_GENDER NOT NULL CHAR(1) CUST_YEAR_OF_BIRTH NOT NULL NUMBER(4) CUST_MARITAL_STATUS VARCHAR2(20) CUST_STREET_ADDRESS NOT NULL VARCHAR2(40) CUST_POSTAL_CODE NOT NULL VARCHAR2(10) CUST_CITY NOT NULL VARCHAR2(30) CUST_CITY_ID NOT NULL NUMBER CUST_STATE_PROVINCE NOT NULL VARCHAR2(40) CUST_STATE_PROVINCE_ID NOT NULL NUMBER COUNTRY_ID NOT NULL NUMBER CUST_MAIN_PHONE_NUMBER NOT NULL VARCHAR2(25) CUST_INCOME_LEVEL VARCHAR2(30) CUST_CREDIT_LIMIT NUMBER CUST_EMAIL VARCHAR2(30) CUST_TOTAL NOT NULL VARCHAR2(14) CUST_TOTAL_ID NOT NULL NUMBER CUST_SRC_ID NUMBER CUST_EFF_FROM DATE CUST_EFF_TO DATE CUST_VALID VARCHAR2(1) SQL As you can see, the CUSTOMERS table is action packed with 55,500 scintillating (not really) rows of customer data while the CUSTOMERS2 table has nothing at this time.In order to remedy that problem we’re going to write an anonymous PL/SQL program to bulk collect data from CUSTOMERS into a PL/SQL collection then use FORALL to load the data into CUSTOMERS2.

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